Teacher Accused Of Killing A Student Over A Spelling Mistake

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India teacher allegedly kills Dalit student over spelling mistake – Al Jazeera English

Teachers are considered to be generally patient people. They guide students through the learning process, showing them new concepts and breaking it down step by step. Mistakes are considered to be a normal part of learning.
However, for one Dalit student, making a misstep cost him his life at the hands of his teacher. A mere spelling mistake during a test drove his teacher to murder.

Nikhil Dohre, 15, was kicked and struck with a rod by his high school teacher after misspelling the word “social” in an exam. He died from his injuries on Monday.

Hundreds of people took to the streets in New Delhi to protest the attack on a boy by his teacher, who they say was a caste-based hate crime. The police used force to quell the mob.

Riya Singh, co-founder of the Dalit Women Fight organisation, told Al Jazeera that caste hatred is so entrenched that people are killing young children to justify their caste bias.

Dalits are victims of thousands of attacks each year. One of these attacks involved a group of men who committed horrendous crimes against underage girls. Six men were arrested for raping and killing two teenage girls.

For additional information on this shocking story, please consider the news outlets listed below to stay in the know.

  1. India teacher allegedly kills Dalit student over spelling mistake  Al Jazeera English
  2. Indian teacher allegedly beats student to death over spelling mistake  TRT World

  3. India teacher reportedly kills student for making spelling mistake  Daily Sabah

  4. Teacher accused of killing low-caste student over misspelling a word on an exam in India  CBS News

  5. View Full Coverage on Google News
John Nightbridge is a veteran reporter, researcher, and economic policy major from UCLA. Passionate about world issues and potential ways to solve them is a significant focus of his work. Writing freelance and reading the news are John's passions at work. Outside of work, it's all about sky diving, surfing, and stock market modeling.